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19th C

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21st C

 

Transport in the 1920s
Click on the pictures below to view the larger images

1920s

To facilitate the building of the Sutton Bypass, the contactor provided a temporary narrow-gauge railway. A steam-powered excavator is seen digging out the cutting at Church Hill;, Cheam. The Bypass opened in 1928.

From the Sutton Local Studies Collection

1920s

The contractor's narrow-gauge railway used two small saddle-tank locomotives believed to have originated in America.

From the Sutton Local Studies Collection

1920s

Another view of the locomotive in the picture above, with the second locomotive seen behind.

From the Sutton Local Studies Collection

1920s

The second saddle-tank locomotive was a Kerr, Stuart & Company-built
'Wren' class locomotive. Note the broken coupling rod between the wheels. Kerr, Stuart & Company were based in Stoke, and built many classes of small locomotives as well as having a significant passenger coach construction business which saw their products in many parts of the world in the early 20th century.

From the Sutton Local Studies Collection

1920s

London Generalís solid-tyred S439 in Malden Road, Cheam on route 113 from Raynes Park to Banstead in the 1920s.

From the Sutton Local Studies Collection

c. 1925

A London General K class single deck bus in Malden Road, Cheam. This picture probably dates from around 1925, well before the Metropolitan Police permitted an increase in the speed limit for buses with pneumatic tyres from 12mph to 20mph in 1928.

From the Sutton Local Studies Collection

c. 1925

Two London General single deck buses. Looking south down Hackbridge Road the approaching bus is stopping at the bus stop at Hackbridge Triangle and is destined for Streatham. On the other side of the road, a similar bus moves off in the direction of Carshalton and Wallington.

From the Sutton Local Studies Collection

1928

The S type bus illustrated is running from Epsom to Charing X in 1928 with London General Omnibus Company Limited, a predecessor of London Transport. The bus, and route 180, was based at Sutton Garage. Note the solid tyres, and the driver in his summer uniform. It was only in 1925 that the Metropolitan Police gave permission for buses to have covered top decks!

From the Sutton Local Studies Collection

1928 - October

The last railway line to be built at Sutton was that from Wimbledon. Here the cutting alongside Gander Green Lane is being cut out by a drag excavator.

From the Sutton Local Studies Collection

1928 - October

The temporary railway line in the new cutting near what was to become Sutton Common Station. The contractor's train was used to move soil removed in forming the cutting to the top of the embankment (see picture above). A temporary water tower is in place to provide for the needs of the engine provided.

From the Sutton Local Studies Collection

1929

A wonderful view of Sutton Station soon after it was rebuilt in 1928. The picture is notable for the evidence of three kinds of traction. Note the funnel of the Epsom-bound train just entering the picture bottom-right, the newly placed DC electric third rails through the Epsom Downs platforms to the left, and the overhead AC catenary wires (recently, or very shortly to become obsolete) just about seen hanging from the AC catenary posts. The new third-rail trains commenced running on 22nd September 1929, and the overhead wiring was removed shortly afterwards.

From the Sutton Local Studies Collection

1928+

The passenger entrance to the very smart 1928 rebuild of Sutton station.

From the Sutton Local Studies Collection

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